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Mick Strong
Coventry
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1 of 102  Tue 19th Dec 2023 6:26pm  
: Joined Sep 2013  Total posts:857

From the "Hillfields" posts by Lindatee & Dreamtime regarding 1/- and half crown for pocket money. Got me wondering if pocket money was still given to children and grand children. I don't ever remember getting money without earning it. From 13 or 14, I had a paper round (from Steve Holts in Canley Road) and a Saturday bread round with a Suttons driver friend of my dads.
Mick Strong

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Choirboy
Bicester
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2 of 102  Tue 19th Dec 2023 11:19pm  
: Joined Nov 2020  Total posts:101

I think I remember being paid 1d for each choir practice and 2d for each service, paid out at Christmas, a potential earning of £1.08p.a. Weddings were a bonus at 2s/6d a go but there were few of those at my church. Otherwise the bank of mum and dad gave 1/- a week rising to 10/- in the sixth form. I did get a casual job selling paint in a decorator's warehouse in Gosford Street but I can't remember the wages.
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JohnnieWalker
Sanctuary Point, Australia
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3 of 102  Wed 20th Dec 2023 6:51am  
: Joined Jul 2011  Total posts:320

Does anyone else remember the brilliant Navy Lark BBC Radio series, where from time to time a "thick-as-two-planks-sounding" voice would interrupt the inanity of Captain Phillip's musings with "In-telli-gence Spea-king". Highlights of my growing up years - the Navy Lark, Around the Horne, the Goon Show etc!
True Blue Coventry Kid

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PhiliPamInCoventry
Holbrooks
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4 of 102  Wed 20th Dec 2023 8:36am  
Moderator, : Joined Apr 2010  Total posts:4439

Often listen to it on 4X. Most folks don't realise that Ronnie Barker made his first broadcast roll in that wireless show.
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Dreamtime
Perth Western Australia
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5 of 102  Wed 20th Dec 2023 9:45am  
: Joined Jan 2010  Total posts:2549

A little something to liven your day. Big grin
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Helen F
Warrington
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6 of 102  Wed 20th Dec 2023 10:30am  
Moderator, : Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:4210

Ok, fess up. Where have you stuck the secret camera in my home? Lol In the episode of Dinner Ladies by Victoria Wood where her character's mum is blown up, she looks exactly like an orangutan - ginger fur, big black eyes and brown markings on her face.
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Slim
Another Coventry kid
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7 of 102  Wed 20th Dec 2023 12:33pm  
: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:635

On 19th Dec 2023 6:26pm, Mick Strong said: From the "Hillfields" posts by Lindatee & Dreamtime regarding 1/- and half crown for pocket money. Got me wondering if pocket money was still given to children and grand children. I don't ever remember getting money without earning it. From 13 or 14, I had a paper round (from Steve Holts in Canley Road) and a Saturday bread round with a Suttons driver friend of my dads.
That was exactly my experience. That's how I was brought up - if you want money, earn it. It has stood me in good stead in life. Kept me nose clean, never had a criminal conviction - apart form the odd speeding offence when I was younger, but it was not my fault that the stupid speed limits on roads like the A45 had been erroneously set too low because of human error. They are even lower today! Now here's a funny thing. I got done for speeding in slow vehicles like a Morris van or an HA Viva whilst only going moderately above the fictitious speed limits. But on a motorbike, I was mentally on a race track. Speed limits did not exist in my mind. Every A to B journey had to be done in the quickest time. Recklessly fast, I was. Yet I never got done. Never even stopped and ticked off by the police. It often amazes me that I am still alive today. And what a small world. Living in Canley Road from the age of 12 until about 18, I used to do 3 rounds every morning, the Riddings, Rochester Road and the Dip (as we called Henry Parkes Rd). They all fitted into one bag, and followed each other. I woke at 0545 every morning without an alarm clock, was down at Jim Holt's at 0600 bagging up (Jim was out in his car doing the new Cannon Park estate round/s). I loved it, whatever the weather. By 0700 I was back home for breakfast before going to school or, later, work. Yes, I carried on after leaving school as I needed the money. I also did 5 rounds out of Jim's total of 8 rounds on a Sunday. That was a killer as the 5 separate bags were so heavy, with the broadsheets and all the supplement magazines. Jim used to live in the old family house in Canley Road, with his elderly mother until she died, and several cats. Jim was always spotlessly clean, shaven and immaculately dressed in a suit, whilst the house could best be described as a hovel. A positive health risk. When not attending to the paper shop business, Jim was away somewhere in the country at a racecourse. Northampton was a favourite venue. The shop at the front was an old style barber shop, run by another of Jim's brothers who lived elsewhere. As a young lad, sitting in the barber's chair, I often wondered what the advert on the top shelf was all about. It was for a family planning product, whatever that was. I was never asked if I needed anything for the weekend. I don't suppose they would have had spare parts for my bicycle, go-kart or radio. I think Jim's brother Steve lived at Wainbody. He would turn up at about 1630 in the week to collect his papers, which were all delivered to Jim's shoplet/house/hovel. I think his rounds were further over Canley like Prior Deram. I remember Steve having a noticeable Brummy accent. He once asked my mate "did yuh give the the girl 'er pipers?" In later years, Jim told me some thug (not the exact word Jim used) had bashed Steve over the lead with a lead cosh and stolen the weekly takings, after Steve had collected the weekly paper money from the houses of his rounds, in Gerrard Avenue, causing serious injury and meaning he could not work for a long time. I'm not sure what happened to Steve. But in the 80s, he used to supply papers and magazines to Warwick Uni before retiring. And he hated Jim's cats, and chased them off. But not if Jim was present.
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lindatee2002
Virginia USA
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8 of 102  Wed 20th Dec 2023 3:17pm  
: Joined Apr 2015  Total posts:309

On 20th Dec 2023 6:51am, JohnnieWalker said: Does anyone else remember the brilliant Navy Lark BBC Radio series, where from time to time a "thick-as-two-planks-sounding" voice would interrupt the inanity of Captain Phillip's musings with "In-telli-gence Spea-king". Highlights of my growing up years - the Navy Lark, Around the Horne, the Goon Show etc!
Loved these radio programmes, especially the often rude Round the Horn whilst eating Sunday dinner.
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lindatee2002
Virginia USA
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9 of 102  Wed 20th Dec 2023 3:23pm  
: Joined Apr 2015  Total posts:309

On 20th Dec 2023 9:45am, Dreamtime said: A little something to liven your day. Big grin
I recently had my hair cut shorter than usual thinking that I would avoid this look but guess what !!!
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JohnnieWalker
Sanctuary Point, Australia
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10 of 102  Wed 20th Dec 2023 7:47pm  
: Joined Jul 2011  Total posts:320

On 20th Dec 2023 3:17pm, lindatee2002 said:
On 20th Dec 2023 6:51am, JohnnieWalker said: Does anyone else remember the brilliant Navy Lark BBC Radio series, where from time to time a "thick-as-two-planks-sounding" voice would interrupt the inanity of Captain Phillip's musings with "In-telli-gence Spea-king". Highlights of my growing up years - the Navy Lark, Around the Horne, the Goon Show etc!
Loved these radio programmes, especially the often rude Round the Horn whilst eating Sunday dinner.
Kenneth Horne used to introduce his programmes with a short chat about the happenings the previous week. He had me laughing with one particular story: - "Last week I looked up an old friend" - followed by a pause and "What a ghastly sight that was!" My young and developing brain took a second or two to see the joke, but it obviously stayed with me all these years!
True Blue Coventry Kid

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Helen F
Warrington
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11 of 102  Fri 22nd Dec 2023 8:15am  
Moderator, : Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:4210

The secret to early comedy was that the scripts were highly variable. We remember them fondly because of the gems but forget the sketches or episodes that weren't good . The writers and actors were able to develop stuff that worked. I don't really like Beyond Our Ken but Round the Horne is the same concept but polished. I found the character Eamon Android a joke that never really worked but Julian and Sandie were a great foil for Ken.
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Mick Strong
Coventry
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Thread starter
12 of 102  Fri 22nd Dec 2023 10:11am  
: Joined Sep 2013  Total posts:857

A friendly question. Why is Michelle Mone still a Baroness??
Mick Strong

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Slim
Another Coventry kid
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13 of 102  Fri 22nd Dec 2023 10:15am  
: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:635

Humour is very much an individual thing. I could never see what was remotely funny about the Goons. Grown-up men acting like idiots putting on silly voices. In particular, Harry Secombe's voice really irritated me. Number one, not remotely funny, and number two when he sang, his voice was permanently strained. Spike Milligan: most of the time not funny, just acting like an imbecile with silly voices and mannerisms. But one sketch he did was a corker. A serious newsreader in a suit announced "and now, we go over to the Bishop of [can't remember the city' name] for some words of comfort". The camera then cut to a high-ranking church official in all his regalia, the gown or robe, the stole, and on top of his head, the sort of massive headgear the pope and other clergy members wear in an effort to big themselves up, designed to make their stature and head higher than they are in reality, give themselves an aura of inflated importance, an adrenaline-producing ego boost... Where was I? Oh, yes, words of comfort from the bishop: Milligan then, with perfect mimicking of the hand and head gestures used by the higher orders of the clergy, started on what sounded like a Latin chant: "Leee-breeee-arm,... vaar-leee-arm,... moooor-gah-darn..." I still find it brilliantly funny. The punchline was so unexpected, which is key. Round the Horne. My mother loved to listen to this on the wireless, on a Sunday I think it was. She laughed a lot, although I'm sure that nearly all, if not all of the innuendo went over her head. It certainly went over my head as a schoolboy. Even as a boy, I appreciated great comedians like Tony Hancock, especially when teamed up with Sid James.
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Slim
Another Coventry kid
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14 of 102  Fri 22nd Dec 2023 10:23am  
: Joined Mar 2013  Total posts:635

On 20th Dec 2023 7:47pm, JohnnieWalker said: Kenneth Horne used to introduce his programmes with a short chat about the happenings the previous week. He had me laughing with one particular story: - "Last week I looked up an old friend" - followed by a pause and "What a ghastly sight that was!" My young and developing brain took a second or two to see the joke, but it obviously stayed with me all these years!
It reminds me of one of the textbook models of management from a business studies course I did last century. It was called the ladder effect. Several suits are climbing up a ladder, one after each other. We were told that when you look down (on the lower ranks), all you see is heads. But when you look up, all you see is bums.
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lindatee2002
Virginia USA
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15 of 102  Fri 22nd Dec 2023 1:23pm  
: Joined Apr 2015  Total posts:309

On 22nd Dec 2023 8:15am, Helen F said: The secret to early comedy was that the scripts were highly variable. We remember them fondly because of the gems but forget the sketches or episodes that weren't good . The writers and actors were able to develop stuff that worked. I don't really like Beyond Our Ken but Round the Horne is the same concept but polished. I found the character Eamon Android a joke that never really worked but Julian and Sandie were a great foil for Ken.
We loved Julian and his friend, Sandy, especially when they were waving their lallys(?) We had a cassette tape of Best of Round the Horn that we wore out on car trips. There's a wonderful, much more than a comedian, named Garrison Keiller from Minnesota who had a radio programme we listened to that was a lot like the older shows we loved. Also the Car Guys, whose lawyers were Dewey, Cheathem and Howe, that were a lot of fun.
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